Tuesday, February 16, 2010

SAFE: your voices have been heard!

 

 

 

 


Protected BEE ART
Safe on a sill with the remains
of many past walks and
sweet memories

i listened to all your comments: the don't melt it ones. i really didn't think i would. i feel like i've been made the caretaker of a delicate part of nature here. amazing work. LOOK AT THAT LAST CLOSE UP...mind-boggling.
i first thought that i'd be unwrapping a big clump of yellowish wax, not THIS. i guess the beekeeper cuts off the 'overflow' of cone? and i was astonished to see this. so, i'll just order up some wax. and leave this masterpiece beeeee.
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please click on the last photo to enlarge it. such perfect geometry..

18 comments:

  1. no kidding -- I thought these photos were of an art exhibit somewhere!!! Then when I read it was a beehive you have in your home -- LOL -- so glad you're not melting it down!

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  2. I love bees and honeycombs and all that and I hope our little bee -what is it flock, herd, stock ?, has survived this extraordinary winter.

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  3. Nature at its best. How wonderful it looks with the light shining through. Is most of the honey out? If not why is it not dripping all over your window sill? It must smell divine!

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  4. ROBYN: i have to ask, but i was told this was 'cut off', which makes me imagine that it was sticking out side of the 'boxes' where the bees actually put the honey in the cone, and it really seems there was never any honey in this part.
    just purely the was.

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  5. You are the honey comb keeper now! The enlargement shows perfection...WOW!

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  6. Incredibly gorgeous just as it is. Nature is amazing! I bet it smells wonderful too!

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  7. This is really an incredible object!!

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  8. Rapt wax, perhaps?

    So perfect the form. Natures unnaturally perfect form.

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  9. Amazing!Thanks for the extra explanation.

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  10. yes, nature can create such masterpieces--of course you will want to display this one.

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  11. My mother was a beekeeper, and I wish I had paid more attention......but I think I remember that the bees build the honeycomb onto a frame that has been inserted into the hive along with other frames. The comb is cut off the frame with a special hot knife. The comb is then put into a centrifugal spinner, the honey is extracted out onto the sides of the spinner and collected at the bottom. You then have the empty wax comb remaining to do whatever with: make candles, etc. At least that is what I remember with my imperfect memory.

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